U. S. HistoryThis week students should have their biography book finished. They should be working on the rough draft of their two page typed, double spaced report. below is another copy of the directions given in September.


    Biography Requirements Book:
    Choose a biography about a person dealing with U.S. history. The person may
    be from any time period, but should somehow link to U.S. history. The person
    may be famous, or not too well known. Please pick a book at your reading level.
    Assignment:
    Read a biography of a person connected to U.S. history, and write a two
    page report on the book. Final copy should be typed, size 12 font, double spaced, and
    all of the items below:
    Title:
    Title of the book, author, and the person the book is about.
    Summary:
    Write about a one page summary of your book. Give important details about the person--time period, location, interesting events in the person’s life. Be careful not to get too bogged down with details--keep it brief! Again, about a page.
    Character:
    Do you get a sense of what kind of person your subject was? What
    do you think about your person, and why? About half a page.

    Quote and Citation:
    Pick an interesting sentence or two from the book. Write it and cite it correctly (see example below). Then, explain how this quote impacts you? What do you think about, can you relate to it? About half a page.
    The quote (in quotation marks), author’s last name and page number of the book in parentheses. No comma between these two.
    For example: “This was the famous blood-eagle--an arrangement of death that the Vikings thought amusing.” (Rutherford 306).

    Biography
    Title ____/1
    Author ____/1
    Topic ____/1
    Typed ____/1
    Double spaced ____/1
    12 font ____/1
    Quote ____/2
    Citation ____/2
    Summary P ____/30
    Opinion P ____/15
    Quote P ____/15
    Total ____/70
    Grade ____
    DUE __11_/_6__/_14__
      LA/ History Block - Week of Oct. 20
      Students will be working on reading and inference skills in Language Arts. In history we will be finding out some of the causes of the American Revolution, such as the Boston Tea Party. Tuesday we will be seeing a movie and takiing notes. Tuesday night ask your student what they found out. Students should be reading at home this week for practice.

      Have a good week.

      Mrs. Gibbs
        LA/ History Test Oct. 8thVocabulary Test Wednesday, Oct. 8, 2014
        Students will be having a test on Ch. 2 vocabulary.

        If you would help your student practice these terms, that would be great.

        Ch. 2 Vocabulary List

        analyze - To examine carefully; study closely

        attitude - A point of view; state of mind; way of thinking or feeling

        category - A group of people or things having something in common; type

        contrast - An obvious difference

        critical - Disapproving; tending to find fault

        deliberate - Done on purpose; carefully planned

        excessive - Too much; more than is reasonable

        fragile - Easily broken or damaged

        frustration - A feeling of bad luck and helplessness that comes from bad luck, defeat, or failure; disappointment

        indicate - To show; serve as a sign or signal
          U. S. HistoryChapter 6 Test Wednesday, Oct. 8, 2014
          Students will be having a test on Ch. 6, Life in the American Colonies. We have read, written and discussed notes. Students should review the notes and vocabulary before the test. A large portion of the test is vocabulary. If you would help your student practice these terms, that would be great.

          *** Also by next Sunday,Students should be 80% through reading their biography book for project due Nov. 6th ***

          Chapter 6 Vocabulary
          subsistence farm- When you grow just what your family needs
          export- to sell goods to another country
          import- buy goods from another country
          cash crop-food crops grown to be sold
          apprentice- a person who is trained by a master craft worker
          urban- in or near a city
          rural- areas in the country side with low populations
          tidewater- areas in a river where the depth of a river rises and falls with the change of the ocean tide
          Middle Passage- The transporting of slaves in crowded conditions from Africa across the Atlantic
          slave codes- rules and laws that denied slaves most of their rights, they became property
          Bill of Rights- limits of power on a king and queen, rights provided to citizens
          mercantilism- a policy meant to gain wealth for the mother country by selling more than is bought
          Navigation Act- laws to control trade to make the mercantile system to work
          legislature- a lawmaking body, like Congress
            U. S. HistoryTrimester 1 Biography Report Directions
            Each term students in history class (periods 1-3) will complete at home a report or project. Trimester 1 is a Biography. Students will receive these directions and pick a book from our library to read for this project tomorrow, Friday Sept. 12, 2014.

            Biography Requirements Book:
            Choose a biography about a person dealing with U.S. history. The person may
            be from any time period, but should somehow link to U.S. history. The person
            may be famous, or not too well known. Please pick a book at your reading level.
            Assignment:
            Read a biography of a person connected to U.S. history, and write a two
            page report on the book. Final copy should be typed, size 12 font, double spaced, and
            all of the items below:
            Title:
            Title of the book, author, and the person the book is about.
            Summary:
            Write about a one page summary of your book. Give important details about the person--time period, location, interesting events in the person’s life. Be careful not to get too bogged down with details--keep it brief! Again, about a page.
            Character:
            Do you get a sense of what kind of person your subject was? What
            do you think about your person, and why? About half a page.

            Quote and Citation:
            Pick an interesting sentence or two from the book. Write it and cite it correctly (see example below). Then, explain how this quote impacts you? What do you think about, can you relate to it? About half a page.
            The quote (in quotation marks), author’s last name and page number of the book in parentheses. No comma between these two.
            For example: “This was the famous blood-eagle--an arrangement of death that the Vikings thought amusing.” (Rutherford 306).

            Biography
            Title ____/1
            Author ____/1
            Topic ____/1
            Typed ____/1
            Double spaced ____/1
            12 font ____/1
            Quote ____/2
            Citation ____/2
            Summary P ____/30
            Opinion P ____/15
            Quote P ____/15
            Total ____/70
            Grade ____ DUE __11_/_6__/_14__
              LA/ HistoryVocabulary Chapter 1
              Every two weeks we will have a new set of vocabulary words to complete activities on and take a test on. This week we began with the Chapter 1 list. The words have been selected because they are high frequency words in textbooks and testing.Please help your student practice the meanings through the next ten day, so they will be ready for the quiz.

              Chapter one Vocabulary list
                U. S. HistoryBelow are the directions to the writing assignment we will work on tomorrow, Tuesday, in class. You have heard enough of the exploration story to complete this tonight if you like to get a head start. This will be due Wednesday.

                Exploration of the Americas by Europe Paragraph
                Homework- Write a 6-8 sentence paragraph that explains some part of the exploration story I told you on Friday and Monday.

                This might include one of the following:
                1. Some of the reason Europeans came to the Americas
                2. What regions different countries claimed. (Spain, Portugal, England or France)
                3. Details about one of the explorers and what they did. ( Columbus, Cortez, Pizarro, Magellan, Hudson, Cartier, Marquette and Joliet, Sir Francis Drake or Prince Henry the Navigator of Portugal)
                4. Events that led up to the exploration ( Feudal System, trade with Asia and Middle East, Battle of the Spanish Armada, Queen Elizabeth I of England, etc.)
                Spelling, neatness and conventions matter to me. Do a nice job. Thank you.
                  8th Grade L. A. and U. S. History Block Periods 4 & 58th Grade L. A. and U. S. History Block Syllabus

                  Course Syllabus and Classroom Procedures 
Baker Prairie Middle School
                  Course: 8th Grade Language Arts/ U.S. History Block
                  Instructor: Mrs. Kathy Gibbs

                  Contact Information: Mrs. Kathy Gibbs
                  RM A106 / (503) 263-7170 Ext. 3618
                  Email Address gibbsk@canby.k12.or.us

                  Course Description: This course is a two period block covering both Language Arts and U. S. History. Throughout the year your child will be writing in a variety of modes, and developing their skills in written communication to the meet the 8th grade standards. Reading selections will focus on U. S History topics from colonization through the Civil War. The goals in the class include building on reading and writing skills while working on the students understanding of American History and government. Anticipate homework on Monday nights for the first four weeks of school to help develop the skill of working outside the classroom. Students should also be reading a book at home a few times a week.

                  Materials: Paper
                  Pencil/Pen
                  Three ring binder
                  Hi-lighters
                  Planner
                  Lined Composition Book

                  Common Core State Standards:
                  Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.

                  Write routinely over extended and shorter time frames.

                  Read closely to determine what the text says explicitly and to make logical inferences from it; cite specific textual evidence when writing or speaking to support conclusions drawn from the text.

                  Determine central ideas or themes of a text and analyze their development; summarize the key supporting details.

                  Class Rules:
                  Stay on task
                  Own your behavior
                  Always come prepared
                  Respect yourself, your school, and those around you

                  School-wide Expectations:
                  Be on time, be prepared, be respectful and be responsible.
                  Hats, Cell phones, ear buds/headphones and all other electronic devices must be stored in student’s lockers between the hours of 7:40 and 2:30.
                  Students are expected to follow the dress code as described in the student handbook. Students who violate the dress code will be asked to change clothes or parents may be called to provide suitable attire before the student is allowed to return to class.
                  Gum is not allowed on Baker Prairie Campus.

                  Preparation for class: Students are required to bring a pencil, paper, completed homework and a library book each class unless otherwise directed.

                  Expectations for class:
                  1. Everyone has the right to, and should expect to, learn.
                  2. Each individual is worthy of respect.
                  3. Classroom orderliness is necessary for an effective learning environment.
                  4. Hard work is necessary for learning.

                  Earned consequences:
                  1st -- Warning 
                  2nd -- Lunch detention and possible phone call home
                  3rd -- Conference with Mr. Opperman or Mrs. Olsen (Lunch or after school detention, phone call to parent)
                  4th -- Referral


                  Missed Work: If you are absent it is your responsibility to get work from me or another student, and check the class calendar for assignments.

                  Grading: Baker Prairie teachers have moved to standards-based grading.  For many students and parents this marks a new approach to reporting student academic progress. Standards-based grading communicates how students perform on a set of clearly defined learning targets called standards. The purpose of standards-based grading is to identify what students know and are able to do in relation to pre-established learning targets.  
                  Students are graded based on acquired knowledge of the Oregon Content Standards and Common Core State Standards.  Students will be graded under three categories:  formative assessments, summative assessments and learning habits.  Formative assessments are used for learning.  Examples might be quizzes, exit slips, homework, etc. They let students, parents and teachers know how a student is progressing in his/her learning.  Summative assessments are assessments of learning. They let students, parents and teachers know what a student has learned when instruction is over. Examples might be unit exams, essays, etc. Learning Habits are behaviors that students need in order to be successful in academic settings. Examples might be participating in classroom activities, being on time, completing assigned work, etc.  
                  A fourth category called Qualifiers is used for teachers to record items in the grade book that do not impact the student’s grade but are still important for student learning or classroom management. Examples of these might be an assignment given to select students to help prepare them for an upcoming test or re-test or recording which students have turned in an important permission slip. Once again these are not graded and are simply used to inform the teacher.


                  Standards-based grading separates academic performance from learning habits in order to provide parents a more accurate view of a student’s progress in both academic and behavioral areas. Variables such as effort, participation, timeliness, cooperation, attitude, and attendance are recorded separately but will be part of the cumulative grade at mid-terms and at the end of the trimester.

                  Grade Weights:
                  Summative Assessments (Assessments of Learning): 70%
                  Formative Assessment (Assessments for Learning): 20%
                  Learning Habits (Behaviors that impact achievement) 10%


                  Grading Scale
                  A+ 99-100% C+ 79%
                  A 92-98% C 72-78%
                  A- 90-91% C- 70-71%
                  B+ 89% D+ 69%
                  B 82-88% D 62-68%
                  B- 80-81% D- 60-61%
                  F Below 60%


                  Students who did not meet the standard will be given the opportunity to retake assessments. As a prerequisite for retaking assessments teachers may require additional work to be completed. This work is referred to as “qualifiers.”

                  Parent Teacher Conferences: 
I will contact you to share good news concerning your student’s educational growth or to discuss behaviors or work habits that might cause your child difficulty in class. I want to encourage you to email me for any concerns you might have. Formal conferences will be held in the evening during October. This is a scheduled time for you and I to plan our work as a team to enhance your child’s learning experience. I look forward to meeting you!
                  Homework Statement
                  The teachers and administrators at Baker Prairie feel that Practice (sometimes called “Homework” when it is done away from school) is an essential part of the learning experience. Unfortunately there is not always enough time in class to get in the necessary amount of independent practice that leads to student success. Some class work must be completed at home. Sometimes practice (homework) is entered into the grade book and sometimes it is not. However, regardless of whether or not a student receives a score on the homework it is still important that the student complete the work and return to class prepared for the next steps in the learning process.
                    Welcome to U. S. HistoryU. S. History, Periods 1, 2, and 3 Syllabus

                    8th Grade U. S. History
                    Syllabus and Classroom Procedures
                    2014-15
                    Mrs. Kathy Gibbs
                    gibbsk@canby.k12..or.us
                    RM A106 / (503) 263-7170 Ext. 3618

                    Course Description
                    This class covers U.S. History, from the first European contacts with North America (around A.D. 1000) to about 1900. We will be progressing chronologically, in this order:
                    Sept. Colonization of North America
                    Oct. Growth of Colonies/Causes of American Revolution
                    Nov. Revolutionary War, Articles of Confederation
                    Dec. Constitution
                    Jan. Growth of U.S.--War of 1812, Jacksonian Democracy
                    Feb. Westward Movement /Industrial Revolution
                    Mar. Civil War
                    Apr. Reconstruction, Settling the Plains
                    May Dances With Wolves--historical fiction novel
                    June Time cushion/wrap-up, end of the year activities

                    Materials
                    Planner, paper, pencil, pen, colored pencils, a section in binder to store work and notes. Colored markers are optional.
                    Grading Scale
                    Raw Score
                    A+ 99 – 100% C+ 79%
                    A 92 – 98% C 72 – 78%
                    A- 90 – 91% C- 70 – 71%
                    B+ 89% D+ 69%
                    B 82 – 88% D 62 – 68%
                    B- 80 – 81% D- 60 – 61%
                    F Below 60%
                    Grading Weights - 70% summative and 20% formative and 10% learning habits
                    Work
                    The first four weeks of school students will have homework on Mondays and should work on the weekend on the term assignment. Each term students will be expected to complete the term assignment. The quality should represent eight hours of work. THe directions will be posted on my blog once it is assigned.

                    Biography--Read a biography on someone connected to U.S. History, and write a report on that person. Trimester 1, due Thursday, November 6th
                    Historical Fiction Book Report--read a historical fiction novel that somehow deals with U.S. History, and write a report. Trimester 2, due Thursday, February12th
                    Project--go into further depth on a topic that is connected to U.S. History, and show that you’ve learned something via a report, model, video, poster,etc. Trimester 3, due Thursday, May 21

                    Standards Based Grading
                    Baker Prairie teachers have moved to standards-based grading.  For many students and parents this marks a new approach to reporting student academic progress. Standards-based grading communicates how students perform on a set of clearly defined learning targets called standards. The purpose of standards-based grading is to identify what students know and are able to do in relation to pre-established learning targets.  

                    Students are graded based on acquired knowledge of the Oregon Content Standards and Common Core State Standards.  Students will be graded under three categories:  formative assessments, summative assessments and learning habits.  Formative assessments are used for learning.  Examples might be quizzes, exit slips, homework, etc. They let students, parents and teachers know how a student is progressing in his/her learning.  Summative assessments are assessments of learning. They let students, parents and teachers know what a student has learned when instruction is over. Examples might be unit exams, essays, etc. Learning Habits are behaviors that students need in order to be successful in academic settings. Examples might be participating in classroom activities, being on time, completing assigned work, etc.  
                    A fourth category called Qualifiers is used for teachers to record items in the grade book that do not impact the student’s grade but are still important for student learning or classroom management. Examples of these might be an assignment given to select students to help prepare them for an upcoming test or re-test or recording which students have turned in an important permission slip. Once again these are not graded and are simply used to inform the teacher.
                    Standards-based grading separates academic performance from learning habits in order to provide parents a more accurate view of a student’s progress in both academic and behavioral areas. Variables such as effort, participation, timeliness, cooperation, attitude, and attendance are recorded separately but will be part of the cumulative grade at mid-terms and at the end of the trimester.

                    School wide Expectations:
                    1.     Be on time, be prepared, be respectful and be responsible.
                    2.     Hats, Cell phones, ear buds/headphones and all other electronic devices must be turned off and stored in student’s lockers between the hours of 7:45 and 2:30. Parents and students may contact one another using the school office phone (503-263-7170).
                    3.     Students are expected to follow the dress code as described in the student handbook. Students who violate the dress code will be asked to change clothes or parents may be called to provide suitable attire before the student is allowed to return to class.
                    4.     Gum is not allowed on Baker Prairie Campus.

                    Specific Classroom Rules
                    Students will be on time, be prepared, be respectful, and be responsible. An attentive and kind class improves student learning.

                    Attendance/Tardy Policy
                            1. Verbal warning to student
                            2.  Communication with parent(s) & student (documented by teacher)
                            3.  Communication with parent(s), student, & counselor (John or Lynn) (documented by teacher, may include classroom discipline)
                            4.  Referral to Student Center / Administration
                           
                    Student/Parent and Teacher Communication:
                    Teachers will contact parents/guardians to share good news concerning their student’s educational growth or to discuss behaviors or work habits that might cause the student difficulty in class. Students are to meet, outside of class time with the teacher to discuss questions or concerns related to class.  If this contact does not resolve the issue, students are welcome to contact the principal.  Parents are encouraged to communicate with teachers through e-mail or by phone when they have questions or concerns. The most convenient way for parents to get missing work when a student has been absent is to contact the teacher directly. Formal conferences will be held in the evening in October.  This is a scheduled time for parents and teachers to plan to work as a team to enhance the student’s learning experience. Please plan to attend.

                    Homework Statement
                    The teachers and administrators at Baker Prairie feel that Practice (sometimes called “Homework” when it is done away from school) is an essential part of the learning experience. Unfortunately there is not always enough time in class to get in the necessary amount of independent practice that leads to student success. Some class work must be completed at home. Sometimes practice (homework) is entered into the grade book and sometimes it is not. However, regardless of whether or not a student receives a score on the homework it is still important that the student complete the work and return to class prepared for the next steps in the learning process.

                    Reportable Standards Covered
                    Historical Knowledge 1: Evaluate continuity and change over the course of United States history by analyzing examples of conflict, cooperation, and interdependence among groups, societies, or nations including the impact of gender, age, ethnicity and class (8.1, 8.16).
                    Historical Knowledge 2: Analyze the causes as outlined in the Declaration of Independence, and examine the major American and British leaders, key events, international support, and consequences of the American Revolution (8.5).
                    Historical Knowledge 3: Evaluate continuity and change over the course of Unites States history, by analyzing key people and constitutional convention, age of Jefferson, industrial revolution, westward expansion, Civil War (8.2).
                    Historical Knowledge 4: Examine social, political and economic factors that caused westward expansion from American Revolution through reconstruction (8.3).
                    Historical Thinking: Use multiple perspectives, primary sources, context, and reasoning skills to understand the significance of events, people, ideas and institutions pertaining to U.S. History (8.6, 8.7, 8.8, 8.9, 8.18).
                    Geography: Understand and use geographic skills (including maps) and concepts to interpret contemporary and historical issues as they relate to the growth and development of the United States (8.10, 8.11, 8.12).
                    Citizenship: Explain rights and responsibilities of citizens and analyze the changing definition of citizenship and the expansion of rights (8.14, 8.20, 8.21).
                    Constitution: Contrast the impact of the Articles of Confederation as a form of government to the U.S. Constitution (8.15, 8.18).
                    Government Systems:  Examine the development and affect of political parties, and the impact of Supreme Court decisions on government practices and personal liberties (8.17, 8.19).
                    Economics: Understand economic concepts and principles and how available resources are allocated in a market and other economies (8.22, 8.23).
                    Social Science Analysis: Design and implement strategies to research for reliable information, analyze issues, explain perspectives, and resolve issues using the social sciences (8.24, 8.25, 8.26, 8.27, 8.28).
                    Mrs. Kathy Gibbs
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